(05/02/2011)
By Alvin Engelke
alvinengelke@hotmail.com

The Creston Neighborhood Watch will have a table at the Elizabeth "Town Wide Yard Sale" on Saturday, May 7. For those who items they want sold, one should contact either Jerry Poling or Donna Sue Ferrell.

The Creston auction will be held Saturday, May 7, starting at 6 P.M. at the Creston Community Building. Folks can come and tell their turkey hunting yarns or morel hunting yarns or just come to visit & have a good time.

Joe Lantz was calling on Charles Russell. Charles was calling on his brother Euell at Miletree Nursing Home. Recently Euell underwent tests in anticipation of cataract surgery.

Rev. Keith Belt filled his regular appointment at the Burning Springs M. E. Church and served Holy Communion. The church was asked to pray for Israel as it would appear that the enemies are gathering in preparation for attack.

W. Harrison Schenerlein IV found some nice morels on his first mushroom hunt. He also checked out some Tyler County oil wells and the W. P. Snyder, Jr. mooring in Marietta.

The gubernatorial primary has started to get interesting. SEIU (the purple shirt folks who, from time to time beat up those in opposition) & ACORN are backing House Speaker Thompson &, according to press reports, the NRA and the church people (W. Va. for Life) have joined up with the gambling folks and the out of state & foreign investors to back Earl Ray who is running on his & his predecessors record of decades of prosperity for West Virginia, well maintained highways, etc. (that's why we rate at or near Mississippi in all the stats). Some 'so-called' Republicans are also backing Earl Ray and the oligarchy that has ruled the state since 1928 and included with those is former State Senator J. Frank Deem. Recently area residents received what seemed to be campaign material from him and then it was learned that J. Frank plans to run against popular W. Va. State Senator Donna Boley next year in spite of obvious legal challenges.

Dan Bingman, son of the late Vandall Bingman was making inquiry as to whether someone had torn down the old Marshall Vandall home place which is a Creston area landmark. No one has & it looks just like it has for decades.

While the local area was spared the killer tornadoes that ravaged the south and the fires that are burning the west, the local area continues to have rain & more rain. The amphibians have been celebrating but most others have been calling for moderation. The government's autumn olive has been in full bloom as have redbuds, dogwoods, bluebells and Jacks in the pulpit. Also the noxious invasive weed, garlic mustard, is in bloom and now is the time to pull the plants up by the roots to eradicate the pest from one's property. Last year one local landowner pulled up all he could find on his land and the neighbors along the road and this year, so far, only one plant has been found.

"Hoss" Donnelly and wife, The Comely Redhead, & family were visiting Mr. & Mrs. Denver McFarland. Tammy has been suffering from the punies as has Donna Sue Ferrell.

The Creston Area Neighborhood Watch held a litter cleanup along W. Va. 5 on Saturday and picked up 12 bags of trash. Afterwards the workers were served savory venison vegetable soup, sandwiches & Ellen's pineapple upside down cake. Former County Commissioner Roy Copen assisted with the cleanup.

Adam & Anna Yates are back in America after their visit to Transylvania. They had an interesting time in an airport in Poland which was followed by a tour of American airports to get home. Anna noted that in Romania folks still stack hay as folks once did in the Creston area.

There were lots of four wheelers in the area over the weekend.

Another group of fine veneer logs was pulled up along the road on the former T. R. Boggs place. One man who is involved in the timber business noted that the state had completely missed the ball by not encouraging facilities that put added value on West Virginia's logs. Now, it seems quality timber generates wealth for the Peoples' Liberation Army in communist China. The state now has a timber outlook report out that is based on 2007 data but still worth reading.

Kenneth Belt's chariot broke down somewhere down in Straight Creek and he set out walking but gave out. Finally some folks came along and fetched him back home.

Jack dePue noted that farming was getting more expensive and that he was going to have to cut back. With high fuel prices many local folks will have to make changes in what they do. High fuel prices cause the price of fertilize, food and everything else to rise. It was noted that if the federal government had not changed the criteria for measuring inflation it would now be 10% or more. This is reflected most notably in the price of gasoline and crude oil which rose locally to $108.75/bbl. Natural gas produced in March from the Creston area fetched $3.53 or 1/5th the value it would have fetched if the historic crude oil/natural gas price formula still worked.

The play ground equipment for the Creston Community Building was delivered one day last week.

The wood boring bumblebees have been busy. Such is of some concern when one lives in a wooden structure.

Creston Oil Corp. hauled a load of junk through Creston the other day. Down at the Mouth of the Elk "junkers" are taking man hole covers and culvert grates to the junk yards. It is said all the junk goes to Chinese steel mills.

W. E. Smith's Estate's folks had their swab rig in the Creston area working on wells.

The Calhoun road crew worked on the Bear Fork of Little Creek road and did a much better than previously job, it was reported.

Those who have been out and about note that the plants that are grown under chicken wire in clearings in the woods are doing well with the rainy weather. The moist weather has also caused some spectacular bracket fungi to grow.

Bessie Arthur was attending to business in Elizabeth.

Some local women got up early to watch the royal wedding. The Big Eared one whose father & grandfather were Mau Mau terrorists was not invited (wonder why?).


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